Events

Meet the Collections
Indonesian Puppets
Wednesday, April 29; 4 to 5 p.m.

MMWC Faculty Curator Jennifer Goodlander (Assistant Professor in Indiana University's Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance) will present and discuss a selection of Indonesian puppets from the Mathers Museum's collection. Goodlander, a master of wayang kulit--Balinese shadow puppetry--was the instructor for T775/Museums and Performance during Fall Semester 2014, and students in the class curated Still/Moving: Puppets and Indonesia, an exhibit at the MMWC which examines puppets as a way to better understand the dynamic peoples and places of Indonesia--focusing on Javanese, Sundanese, and Balinese cultures.

Museums at the Crossroads
Thursday, May 14; 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Steven Lubar, former curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History and professor in the departments of American Studies and History at Brown University, will discuss the modes of thought, practice, and reception that distinguish the museum from other venues of cultural research and transmission. This free public lecture is being presented as part of Museums at the Crossroads: Local Encounters, Global Knowledge, a new international museum institute bringing together leading scholars of social and cultural theory and museum practice with museum professionals and Indiana University Bloomington scholars, graduate students, and staff. Funded by IU's College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Global and International Studies, Museums at the Crossroads is the first institute of its kind to explore three key issues facing 21st century museums: cultural crossroads--the challenge of understanding interconnected, global cultures; disciplinary crossroads--the challenge of adapting institutions steeped in disciplinary tradition to interdisciplinary studies; and artifactual crossroads--the challenge of adapting to the blurred lines defining categories of "virtual" and "real."

Cultural Crossroads: World Cultures in Transition
Friday, May 15; 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Michael Brown, the president of the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico, explores globalization and localization, and their implications for understanding the relation and movement of states, people, and cultures across space. Brown is the author of many scholarly essays as well as six books, including Who Owns Native Culture? (Harvard University Press, 2003) and Upriver: The Turbulent Life and Times of an Amazonian People (Harvard University Press, 2014). This free public lecture is being presented as part of Museums at the Crossroads: Local Encounters, Global Knowledge, a new international museum institute, funded by IU's College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Global and International Studies, bringing together leading scholars of social and cultural theory and museum practice with museum professionals and Indiana University Bloomington scholars, graduate students, and staff.

Disciplinary Crossroads: Scholarly Method and the Evolving Sociology of Knowledge
Saturday, May 16; 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Stephan Fuchs, Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia, will examine the evolution, interrelation, and current state of history, anthropology, folklore, natural science, and art-disciplines that helped to define museums, and that today offer both benefits and drawbacks to our efforts to arrive at a fresh understanding of global cultures. This free public lecture is being presented as part of Museums at the Crossroads: Local Encounters, Global Knowledge, a new international museum institute, funded by IU's College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Global and International Studies, bringing together leading scholars of social and cultural theory and museum practice with museum professionals and Indiana University Bloomington scholars, graduate students, and staff.

Artifactual Crossroads: Real Meets Virtual
Sunday, May 17; 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Haidy Geismar, Director of the Digital Anthropology program at University College London, will address the revolution in information, from its origins in print and the early electronic age through today's hypermedia, as well as the effect of changing modes of display and dissemination upon learning and teaching. This free public lecture is being presented as part of Museums at the Crossroads: Local Encounters, Global Knowledge, a new international museum institute, funded by IU's College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Global and International Studies, bringing together leading scholars of social and cultural theory and museum practice with museum professionals and Indiana University Bloomington scholars, graduate students, and staff.

Traditional Arts Indiana
Memory Paintings and Death Camps: Gustav Potthoff's Creative-Aging Practice
Wednesday, June 17; 4:30 p.m.

Gustav Potthoff paints to remember his fellow prisoners of war who built the Bridge over the River Kwai and the Hellfire Pass during World War II. Concerned that those 16,000 who died will be forgotten, the artist paints to tell people his story and to find peace among the horrors of his wartime memories by calling all who see his art to remember those who perished building the Thailand-Burma Railway. This program by Traditional Arts Director Jon Kay shares the incredible story of Gustav Potthoff, and explores his life-review practice as a strategy for creative aging. The event, sponsored by Traditional Arts Indiana through support from the Indiana Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, is free and open to the public.